How To: Syntax highlight GLSL shaders in Gedit

GLSL shaders share a lot in common with the C language, and Gedit can syntax highlight C/C++ and a host of other languages – so why not GLSL shaders? Here’s a simple way to make it happen…

1.) Gedit uses gtksourceview for its syntax highlighting rules – so find out where that’s located on your distro with the following:

Once you’ve got the location of the c.lang file, navigate there in the bash (on Ubuntu it’s in /usr/share/gtksourceview-2.0/language-specs).

2.) Make a copy of the c.lang file in case you accidentally stuff it up (optional, but better safe than sorry):

3.) Open the file with your text editor of choice and modify the c.lang file to add in additional file extensions which should be syntax highlighted as per the c.lang definitions:

A couple of lines into the file (after the comments at the top) you’ll see the following:

Assuming you’re ending your vertex shaders with .vp and your fragment shaders with .fp (if you’re using .vert and .frag or such just substitute appropriately), change the line to read:

Save it, close gedit, and open a .vp or .fp file with Gedit – syntax highlighty goodness is rightfully yours. Of course, this is normal C highlighting, not true GLSL highlighting – but it’s a good start.

If you wanted to add things like vec3, uniform etc. then you can find the following sections in the c.lang file and add ’em in yourself:

Cheers!

2 thoughts on “How To: Syntax highlight GLSL shaders in Gedit”

  1. if you give your file extensions like .glslv or .glslf , you will have syntax highlighting for glsl.

    Or you can edit glsl.lang

    1. Thanks for the tip, I don’t think gedit shipped with GLSL highlighting at all back when I wrote this in 2011 – but I didn’t know it had been added either.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.