The This Pointer in C++

Still on my fundamentals trip, I’m hitting up the ‘this’ pointer. Every class that you create has a ‘this’ pointer invisibly assigned to it by the compiler. Let’s look at a simple class to see what’s going on:

When you write the above code the compiler does some fun things with it, such as invisibly adding four methods:

  • A default constructor (that takes no parameters) which is automatically executed when you instantiate an object of this type,
  • A destructor (again no parameters) which is automatically executed when an object of this type is deleted or goes out of scope,
  • A copy constructor (that takes another object of this type) and performs a shallow copy from the source object to the (new) destination object, and
  • An assignment operator (that takes another object of this type) and which again performs a shallow copy from that object the the object you’re assigning to.

If we explicitly write these four methods into our class, we end up with our (exactly, exactly equivalent) code now being:

You can substitute either of these classes into a project, compile it (in Release mode if you have both in there and just comment each out in turn!), and you’ll end up with byte-wise identical executables down to the very last bit. Not only are they functionally equivalent, they’re absolutely equivalent – as the compiler sees them, it’s the exact same code. Don’t take my word for it – try it out, if you’d like!

The ‘this’ pointer’s already being used, but what exactly is it doing? Well, let’s drill down into the nuts and bolts of it and take a look…

Continue reading The This Pointer in C++

A Simple C++ OpenGL Shader Loader

Update: There’s a re-worked and improved version of this shader loading code here: http://r3dux.org/2015/01/a-simple-c-opengl-shader-loader-improved/ – you should probably use that instead of this.


I’ve been doing a bunch of OpenGL programming recently and wanted to create my own shader classes to make setting up shaders as easy as possible – so I did ;-) To create vertex and fragment shaders and tie them into a shader program you can just import the Shader.hpp and ShaderProgram.hpp classes and use code like the following:

There’s also a loadFromString(some-string-containing-GLSL-source-code) method, if that’s your preference.

The ShaderProgram class uses a string/int map as a key/value pair, so to add attributes or uniforms you just specify their name and they’ll have a location assigned to them:

The ShaderProgram class then uses two methods called attribute and uniform to return the bound locations (you could argue that I should have called these methods getAttribute and getUniform – but I felt that just attribute and uniform were cleaner in use. Feel free to mod if you feel strongly about it). When binding vertex attribute pointers you can use code like this:

Finally, when drawing your geometry you can get just enable the shader program, provide the location and data for bound uniforms, and then disable it like this (I’m using the GL Mathematics library for matrices – you can use anything you fancy):

That’s pretty much it – nice and simple. I haven’t done anything with geometry shaders yet so I’ve no idea if there’s anything else you’ll need, but if so it likely won’t be too tricky a job to implement it yourself. Anyways, you can look at the source code for the classes themselves below, and I’ll put the two classes in a zip file here: ShaderHelperClasses.zip.

As a final note, you can’t create anything shader-y without having a valid OpenGL rendering context (i.e. a window to draw stuff to) or the code will segfault – that’s just how it works. The easiest way around this if you want to keep a global ShaderProgram object around is to create it as a pointer (i.e. ShaderProgram *shaderProgram;) and then initialise it later on when you’ve got the window open with shaderProgram = new ShaderProgram(); like I’ve done above.

Cheers! =D

Source code after the jump…

A C++ Camera Class for Simple OpenGL FPS Controls

This is the third post of three, where we finally get to create a Camera class which encapsulates all the important properties of a camera suitable for FPS controls. I could, and indeed did, have this written to just use three floats for the camera position, three for the rotation, three for the movement speed etc – but it makes more sense to use a vector class to encapsulate those values into a single item and provide methods for easy manipulation, so that’s what I’ve done.

The end result of this is that although the Camera class now depends on the Vec3 class, the Camera class itself is now more concise and easier to use. If you don’t like the coupling you can easily break it and return to individual values, but I think I prefer it this way. Oh, and this class is designed to work with GLFW, although it could be very easily modified to remove that requirement and be used with SDL or something instead. In fact, we only ever use the glfwSetMousePos(x, y) method to reset the mouse position to the centre of the screen each frame!

Anyways, let’s look at the header first to see the properties and methods of the class:

Camera.h Header

Now for the implementation:

Camera.cpp Class

Rather than me explaining each individual piece of how to fit it together, here’s a worked example – it’s really quite easy to use:

Finally! Done! You can see a video of the first version of the FPS controls here – this code works identically, it’s just that the Camera is now in its own class, we’re using our own little Vec3 class to keep group and manipulate some values, and the whole thing works in a framerate independent manner thanks to the FpsManager class. Phew!

Cheers!

Avoiding down-casts in C++

If you have to down-cast objects from a base class to a derived class then there’s probably a design flaw in the class structure. It might all work but it’s going to be a brittle design.

A better way to accomplish this is to give the users of your code the right tools in the first place as member functions, rather than them having to cobble together their own routines in userland:

Much better =D

Derived class issues with arrays and casting in C++

I’m working my way through C++ FAQs book by Cline and Lomow, and it’s excellent. There’s lots of issues going on with inheritance, arrays and casting that could be a real pain to deal with towards the end of system development, but that you can nip in the bud and make life easier for yourself. For example, just knowing that an array of objects of a Derived class is NOT a kind-of array of objects of the Base class can prevent you a lot of headaches…

Good to know – now I just have to keep it in mind when I’m coding!