How To: Fix the Shadow Warrior startup DBUS address error on Linux

I picked up the Humble Indie Bundle 14 the other day, which included Shadow Warrior – so I’m all keen to give it a shot on Linux, but when I launched it, I got this DBUS issue:

I’m running 64-bit Arch, and I noticed there was a lib folder – so I thought that would be a good place to start experimenting, and I was right! =D

To get Shadow Warrior to launch, you need to remove the libSDL2 and libOpenAL library (.so) files – but have your Linux distro’s versions installed. I did this by renaming the lib folder to old-lib, creating a new lib folder to take its place, and then trying to launch, getting an error, and copying a lib from the old-lib to the lib folder, which by the time the game would launch gives me:

I have libSDL2 and all lib32-sdl* packages installed, but I have only the native 64-bit version of OpenAL installed (which did not get copied into the remastered ‘lib’ folder) and not the lib32 variant – and yet the game launches and works! So give that a shot – works for me =D

Shadow Warrior - working!

How To: Fix X.org Black Screen with Nvidia drivers and Linux Kernel 3.10+

I’m running Arch Linux with a Nvidia graphics card, and after doing a system update back in March 2014 any kernel past 3.10.x would cause X / Xorg to fail to start; instead there’d be a black screen and the fans on the graphics card would spin up to full speed so my machine sounded like a hovercraft. I initially got around this by running the linux-lts (Long Term Support) kernel, until that too exhibited the exact same issue and I was forced to boot the system from USB, chroot into it and switch out the nvidia driver for nouveau (the open-open source, 2D accelerated nvidia driver).

However, as I happen to quite like accelerated 3D graphics and occasionally playing games, I’ve been digging around for a fix for this for ages – and it turns out that the fix (which is now added to the Arch Nvidia wiki page) is to add the following kernel parameter to your bootloader’s kernel line:

If you’re using GRUB, when menu shows up just move the selection to Arch or your Linux distro exhibiting the issue, then hit the e key to edit the line, and change the linux kernel loading line from, for example:

To include the rcutree kernel parameter, something like this:

At which point you can hit F10 (again, assuming you’re using GRUB) to boot using your newly added kernel parameters. Don’t worry if your kernel loading line identifies your partition by UUID value instead of plain ‘ol /dev/sdx – that’s fine and mine does too (I changed it to /dev/blah to make the line shorter) – just add the parameter and try your luck – hopefully your distro will now boot into X without issue, and you can stop swearing and cursing like a drunken sailor. Or perhaps that was just me.

Further reading about the issue on the nvidia development website: https://devtalk.nvidia.com/default/topic/567297/linux/linux-3-10-driver-crash/4/.

Cheers!

P.S. If you need to chroot into your Arch system to change the drivers also, then here’s a quick run-down of the process. Make a bootable USB from the Arch ISO (I could only get this to work by using the dd command from another Linux distro – Rufus and UNetBootin would make a USB I couldn’t boot from – google or search this site for “dd iso usb” for instructions), then, when you’ve booted into the live USB/CD-ROM or what-not, run the following commands (the “<---- optional" lines are optional, don't actually enter that into your files, obviously!):

With any luck you'll have now transitioned the drivers successfully and have a fully working system - fingers crossed, good luck!

How-To: Fix slow reconnection to Wireless after suspend/sleep in Linux

Every time I’d put my LMDE-running machine to sleep the wireless wouldn’t come up for maybe a minute or so, which isn’t ideal. This could be caused by a variety of conditions, but in my case it turned out that the IPv6 “Automatic” setting was trying to use IPv6 DHCP, and was waiting for this to time-out before accepting the IPv4 DHCP lease.

To change this behaviour, you can modify the IPv6 settings from Automatic to Ignore, like this:

Disabling IPv6 in Gnome 3

If you’re not using Gnome Shell (like in the above screenshot), then maybe try modifying /etc/network/interfaces – really, it’ll depend on your Linux distro where the config is located.

Once IPv6 was disabled the IPv4 DHCP lease was accepted immediately on resume – and it could be the case that if you’ve got the same symptom that it’s caused by the same issue. Regardless, it’s certainly one of the easier things worth trying before you go looking into more involved solutions.

Source: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=708450.

How To: Disable All WordPress Plugins from the Database

I added a couple of WordPress plugins the other day to tack on a little bit of extended functionality to the site, but things went badly, and some bizarre interactions between plugins meant that I couldn’t log in to the WordPress administration interface – it would just throw me back to the main site without even having the option to log in… As such, I couldn’t disable the plugins (because you need to be in the administration interface to do that!), so what the heck to do?

You might think to ssh in to the box and remove the plugins from the …/wp-content/plugins/ folder to disable them (as I did) – only this won’t work. What we really need to do is disable the plugins directly from the database – and luckily for us it’s a pretty simple process as long as we can ssh into the box!

Note: If you dont’ have ssh access to your server, you could always take the phpMyAdmin route to achieve the same goal through a web interface, but if the problem you have is related to being redirected all the time (like mine was) then the direct DB access way is really the only way to go!

Gaining SSH Access

If you’re running linux you’ve already got a ssh client built in, if you’re on Windows then you’ll probably want to get yourself a copy of PuTTY or such.

Assuming the IP address of your server is 1.2.3.4, then you can ssh to the box with:

In the above command the switch is “minus lower-case-L”, not “minus pipe-symbol” or anything, and if you’ve changed your ssh port away from the default of 22, then you can just add the switch -p , so if my ssh daemon was running on port 2233, and I wanted to log in as the user bob, I’d use:

Connect to MySQL

Once you’ve got a ssh connection to the server, the next thing you’ll want to do is connect to your database, with the following command:

So if I had a MySQL administrator called dbAdmin I’d use:

The -p switch on the end will prompt you to enter the password for your MySQL admin user account – don’t worry if you’ve forgotten the credentials you should use – they’ll be in your WordPress wp-config.php file, which is usually located in your www or htdocs root folder (on Linux this is usually /var/www).

Quick Tip: By placing your wp-config.php file in the web root it’s possible for it to be accessed by malicious types, but you don’t have to place it here! You can, in fact, move the file one level up so that it’s outside of the web-root and WordPress will still be able to find it, but scoundrels won’t! So if you’re running WordPress with all your files in /var/www/ just move the wp-config.php file up to /var/ and it’ll still work and be safer! You can do this from the ssh terminal with:

Manipulate the Database

Once you’ve got administrator access to MySQL you need to connect to your database (again, the database name will be in your wp-config.php file), so if we’d called our database myWebDB then we could connect to it through the MySQL command line interface with:

Once this has connected successfully, all you have to do to disable all plugins is issue the following command:

That’s it! Attempt to access your site! Any plugins which were causing mayhem will now be disabled, and you can then add them back one-by-one until you find the combination that’s stuffing things up!

Cheers!

Props: Many thanks to Jeff Star of PerishablePress for his article Quickly Disable or Enable All WordPress Plugins via the Database which saved my bacon, and prompted me to write this quick guide.
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How-To: Fix Missing Bots in ioquake3 in Linux

I don’t do a lot of PC gaming these days, preferring more to just sling a disc in the 360 or PS3 to get my jollies without all the patch/driver hassle, but you’ve got to have a couple of linux games installed to vent the occasional blood-lust. With that in mind, I grabbed the latest version of ioquake3 earlier, and tried out a single player game, but no bots would join the match, and a look at the shell showed errors along the line of:

^1Error: file bots/default_c.c, line 2: file charsh” not found
^3Warning: couldn’t find skill 1 in bots/default_c.c
^1Error: file bots/default_c.c, line 2: file charsh” not found
^1Error: file bots/default_c.c, line 2: file charsh” not found
^1Error: file bots/default_c.c, line 2: file charsh” not found
^3Warning: couldn’t load any skill from bots/default_c.c
^1Error: file bots/kyonshi_c.c, line 2: file charsh” not found
^3Warning: couldn’t find skill 1 in bots/kyonshi_c.c

Apparently it’s only been an issue with the 64-bit version – but even the older version I had was showing the same problem (which I don’t quite get how) – anyways, I recompiled ioquake3 and it’s all fixed up – and thought that if anyone else was up against the same issue it might be useful to know how to fix it quickly and easily.

1.) Get the source

For this we need to have git installed to download the source code, if you do – great!, if not, then run this first:

With git in place, grab the source code with:

2.) Build it

Go into the downloaded ioq3 folder cd ioq3 and then build that bad-boy with this complex command:

Geez, linux is tech ;) To be fair, you’ll need the sdl-dev packages installed (for example: libsdl1.2-dev) and of course build-essential – I didn’t have to get any extra packages, it just built.

3.) Pick a place to stick it

Because I’m the only user of my laptop, I have a folder called Games in my home directory, so I just created ~/Games/ioquake3 and then copied all the files from the build/release-linux-x86_64 sub-folder (created when you successfully built ioquake using that complex make command – your folder won’t have _64 on the end if you built it on a 32-bit system) to ~/Games/ioquake3/, and then copied the pak0 to pak8.pk3 files from my original Windows install of Quake III into the baseq3 subfolder of the ioquake3 folder.

4.) Frag on!

Launch ioquake3.x86_64 and get your game on =D

I have absolutely no idea how they’ve got motion blur on the game (unless it’s applied post-game to the captured footage) – but it looks AWESOME! Want! If you know how they did it please feel free to smack me with the clue-stick in the comments! Cheers! =D

Update: It turns out they’re using the Excessive Plus mod in the video (which works fine with ioquake), still no clue about the motion blur though…

Another Update: Turns out this issue exists in the 64-bit version of OpenArena as well as ioquake3. I rebuilt openarena using the 0.81 version from the svn here – but still no dice with getting bots to spawn. Apparently the 32-bit version of OpenArena is unaffected.